CPR training revision

Article by Josh Sauberman

CPR training revision

Hi, I'm Josh, and Jason invited me to share some information about CPR. I'm an ex-firefighter who now provides CPR and first aid training in the San Fransisco Bay area. The +people Partnership and setters focus on behavioral safety and cultural development. When people first learn about habits, mind states, risk perception and other psychological factors, a light bulb can go off, and they can consciously improve safety and performance rather than just intellectually knowing about it.

Over the years, we have created better systems and practices to keep people safe. We learn from mistakes and become more aware of potential hazards. The use of PPE has improved, as well as safer equipment.

Most of these improvements are gradual and are made without pressure. What about when things go wrong? When we're faced with an emergency? We experience a new set of pressures and stress, and what might seem simple in everyday situations can be forgotten in the moment.

CAB CPR stands for "compressions, airway, breathing." It is a mnemonic used to remember the order in which you perform the steps of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR).

The CAB sequence is a simplified version of the traditional ABC (airway, breathing, compressions) sequence, which is still used in some cases. However, the CAB sequence is generally recommended for most adults and children who are not breathing and do not have a pulse, as it emphasizes the importance of compressions in CPR.

Here is a brief overview of the steps of CAB CPR:

  1. Compressions: Begin by placing the person on their back on a firm, flat surface. Place the palm of one hand on the center of the person's chest and place the other hand on top of the first hand. Push down hard and fast on the chest, keeping the rate at least 100-120 compressions per minute.
  2. Airway: After 30 compressions, open the person's airway by tilting their head back with one hand and lifting their chin with the other hand.
  3. Breathing: Pinch the person's nose shut and give two breaths into their mouth. Each breath should be a full, deep inhalation that lasts about 1 second.

It's important to note that CPR should only be performed by trained individuals who can recognize when CPR is necessary and have the proper training to perform the technique safely. If you are not trained in CPR, it is important to call emergency services and follow their instructions.

There are several types of CPR training programs available to individuals who want to learn how to perform CPR. These programs can be provided by a variety of organizations, including schools, community centers, workplaces, and healthcare facilities. Some common types of CPR training programs include:

  1. Basic Life Support (BLS) CPR: This type of CPR training is designed for healthcare providers and other professionals who are responsible for providing basic life support in a medical setting. BLS CPR training typically covers the steps of CPR, how to utilize an automated external defibrillator (AED) and other basic life support skills.
  2. Heartsaver CPR: This type of CPR training is designed for laypeople who want to learn CPR and basic life support skills for use in a non-medical setting. Heartsaver CPR training typically covers the steps of CPR, as well as how to utilize an AED and other basic life support skills.
  3. Pediatric CPR: This type of CPR training is designed for people who want to learn how to perform CPR on children. Pediatric CPR training covers the steps of CPR, as well as how to utilize an AED and other basic life support skills, with a focus on the specific needs of children.
  4. Advanced Life Support (ALS) CPR: This type of CPR training is designed for healthcare providers who are responsible for providing advanced life support in a medical setting. ALS CPR training covers advanced techniques and procedures for managing cardiac and respiratory emergencies, including the use of medications and advanced airway management techniques.

It's important to note that the specific content and requirements of CPR training programs may vary depending on the organization offering the training and the specific needs of the students.

If you would like a free CPR Infographic, you can get one here: CAB CPR INFOGRAPHIC. You're more than welcome to download, share, print and put on the wall to help remind others. If you publish it online, please add proper attribution back to CPREdu.com.

Here's a printer-friendly version with less colored ink: CAB CPR INFOGRAPHIC (PRINTER-FREINDLY).

 

 

Article by Josh Sauberman

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